Geology of the Fanjiabauzi Talc Deposit, Liaoning Province, China

Research output: ThesisMaster's ThesisResearch

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Abstract

The talc deposits of China are world class concerning size and quality of mineralization. The largest deposit of China is located near the Village of Mafeng in the Eastern Liaoning Province (Fanjiabauzi). Mineralizations of talc occur in Early Proterozoic Mg-rich carbonates. The region also hosts some of the world’s largest magnesite deposits. Talc from Fanjiabauzi is remarkably pure and shows only minor impurities compared to other deposit types, especially compared to alpine talc deposits. Genesis of talc and host rock was heavily discussed in the past, new data concerning rock chemistry, isotopic composition and composition of fluid inclusions strengthens the widespread thesis of primary magnesite formation in an Early Proterozoic, shallow marine or lagoonal environment with significant freshwater influence. Later multiple deformation events formed large, high-quality magnesite marble deposits along an E-W-trending belt in the Eastern Liaoning Province. The age of hydrothermal talc formation responsible for the high-quality talc deposit of Fanjiabauzi remains unclear, as the deformation history in the region is very complex. Multiple deposit forming processes occurred in several mineralization periods throughout the geologic history from the Early Proterozoic till the young Himalayan orogenic event. Nevertheless, chemical analysis of talc shows no evidence for multiple generations of talc formation. Several other hydrothermal deposits in the Eastern Liaoning Province are attributed to the Triassic (Indosinian) metallogenic period, correlation of the Fanjiabauzi deposit with other locations in the region requires further investigation.

Details

Translated title of the contributionGeologische Charakterisierung der Talklagerstätte Fanjiabauzi in der östlichen Liaoning Provinz, China
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDr.mont.
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Award date14 Dec 2012
Publication statusPublished - 2012